Amazon.com Widgets

« December 2009 | Home | ">February 2010 »

January 2010 Archives

January 28, 2010

The Chalet Girl

Author: Tom Williams Genre: Romantic Comedy/Sports Storyline: 7 Dialogue: 8 Characterization: 7 Writer’s Potential: 7 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Consider Logline:A working-class skateboarding champion is forced to take a servant job at an Alpine resort, where she discovers snowboarding. Synopsis:Displaying…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 11:54 AM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 27, 2010

Demon Road

Author: William Butler & Michael S. Deak & Matt Morgan Genre: Horror/Thriller Storyline: 5 Dialogue: 5 Characterization: 4 Writer’s Potential: 5 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Pass Logline:A troubled woman running from the law and a mysterious hitchhiker team up to…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 9:57 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 28, 2010

Isolation

Author: Chris Billett and Stephen Kay Genre: Thriller Storyline: 3 Dialogue: 5 Characterization: 3 Writer’s Potential: 3 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Pass Logline:A young doctor struggles to understand how she ended up in a hospital isolation room, suffering from an…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 11:06 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

Vamps

Author: Amy Heckerling Genre: Romantic Comedy/Horror Storyline: 4 Dialogue: 7 Characterization: 5 Writer’s Potential: 6 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Pass Logline:Two vampire party girls face persecution and find love in New York City. Synopsis:GOODY (20s), adorable in an old-fashioned way,…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 6:20 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 30, 2010

Bad Luck

Author: David J. Schow Genre: Comedy/Horror Storyline: 3 Dialogue: 3 Characterization: 5 Writer’s Potential: 3 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Pass Logline:A college student is forced to question her disbelief in superstitions when her friends begin dying in superstitious ways. Synopsis:A…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 12:40 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 29, 2010

The Good Doctor

Author: John Enbom Genre: Drama/Thriller Storyline: 7 Dialogue: 8 Characterization: 7 Writer’s Potential: 7 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Consider Logline:A lonely first-year resident secretly makes his favorite patient sicker in order to keep her in his care. Synopsis:MARTIN PLOECK (27)…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 3:52 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

The Chain

Author: Unknown Genre: Crime/Thriller/Political Storyline: 6 Dialogue: 7 Characterization: 5 Writer’s Potential: 6 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Pass Logline:In 1999, Nebraska sheriff’s deputy unravels a conspiracy involving illegal immigrants and the meatpacking industry. Synopsis:A montage shows “the chain” — cattle going from…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 6:45 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 30, 2010

Zebras

Author: David Williamson Genre: Docudrama/Sports Storyline: 6 Dialogue: 7 Characterization: 6 Writer’s Potential: 7 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Pass Logline:In the early 1980s, a rebellious South African record producer coaches a mixed-race soccer team in an effort to fight apartheid…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 7:20 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 31, 2010

How I Spent My Summer Vacation

Author: Mel Gibson Genre: Crime/Action/Comedy Storyline: 7 Dialogue: 7 Characterization: 8 Writer’s Potential: 8 Jump to: [Synopsis] [Comments] Recommendation?Consider Logline:Amid the chaos and corruption of a Mexican prison, an American criminal bonds with a Mexican boy. Synopsis:After a reckless chase…

Posted by D. B. Bates at 11:59 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Professional Script Coverage

January 12, 2010

Script Review: The Book of Eli by Gary Whitta and Anthony Peckham

[In lieu of actual content, for the next several weeks I will present, at least, one review of an upcoming film each week. These are scripts that I’ve been paid money to read, and many of them contain watermarking, identification numbers, password-protection, and other ways of tracking what company it was sent to; because of this and my desire to keep my job, I will not offer downloads for ANY of the scripts I review here. Don’t bother asking.]

The Book of Eli tells a pretty straightforward western story: one taciturn man shows up in a town controlled by a power-hungry madman. Captain Taciturn (hereafter known as Eli) has something the madman wants, and the madman is confounded when Eli won’t give it up immediately. He’s not used to a fight, but a fight is exactly what Eli intends to give him. Does any of this sound familiar?

The amazing thing about The Book of Eli is that it uses genre tropes so damn effectively. It paints a startling, “a few years after The Day After” nightmare world, but aside from that, it’s your standard western plot. More than anything, it shows the importance of developing characters. Audiences are much more willing to go along with a plot they’ve seen before (and what plot haven’t they seen before?) if the characters within that well-worn storyline breathe new life into it.

Read "Script Review: The Book of Eli by Gary Whitta and Anthony Peckham" »

Posted by D. B. Bates at 1:54 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (0) | Script Reviews, Reviews

January 5, 2010

Script Review: Daybreakers by Michael & Peter Spierig

[In lieu of actual content, for the next several weeks I will present, at least, one review of an upcoming film each week. These are scripts that I’ve been paid money to read, and many of them contain watermarking, identification numbers, password-protection, and other ways of tracking what company it was sent to; because of this and my desire to keep my job, I will not offer downloads for ANY of the scripts I review here. Don’t bother asking.]

Here we are in the world of Daybreakers, in which vampires have become the majority (after some sort of viral pandemic) and the few humans left (5% of the total world population) are hunted for their delicious blood. After establishing this offbeat world and its central conflict — that vampire numbers increase while the “food” supply dwindles — the writers focus on hapless vampire hematologist Ed Dalton. He works for a pharmaceutical magnate, Bromley, who farms humans to provide blood for vampires. Ed, who’s conflicted about using humans, has the moral-balancing task of coming up with a feasible substitute that can sustain vampires without requiring them to kill humans.

One night, Ed comes upon an erratically driving car, which narrowly avoids hitting his sunlight-proofed Escalade. The car’s on the run from the police, because it’s filled with humans (including AUDREY, the de facto love interest). Ed surprises the humans by allowing them to hide in his Escalade while he lies to the police about where they ran off to. Once the police get a safe distance away, the humans leave — but not before Audrey notices Ed’s work ID badge, which identifies him as a hematologist. Ed continues home, where younger brother FRANKIE has returned from military service (in this world, the military simply hunts for human camps). It’s Ed’s birthday — which Ed deems meaningless, considering his immortality — so Frankie surprises him with a premium bottle of 100% human blood. Ed and Frankie argue about the righteousness of killing humans to feed on their blood.

Before the argument can get too heated (though it does get heated enough for Frankie to smash the bottle against the wall), they’re attacked by a “subsider” — a freakish sort of vampire who feeds on other vampires (and/or themselves). This is the sort of world they live in. Frankie and Ed dispatch the subsider. After the police sweep the scene, they discover the subsider was actually a neighbor who disappeared. Ed is incredibly disturbs and feels increased pressure to come up with a substitute. Later that night, Audrey sneaks into Ed’s house, announces that the vampire world is falling apart (citing, among other things, the opening scene — a child vampire committing suicide after deeming an ageless body pointless). Ed tells Audrey he can’t help her, but she gives him a note with a meeting place and time. After Audrey leaves, Frankie hears the commotion and wonders who it was. Ed says it was nobody, but Frankie is quietly suspicious.

Read "Script Review: Daybreakers by Michael & Peter Spierig" »

Posted by D. B. Bates at 4:54 PM | Print-Friendly | Comments (9) | Script Reviews, Reviews